Tuesday, August 20, 2019





PRESS RELEASE

Woodlot Management Walk and Talk

Saturday, September 21st, 2019 from 10:00 am to 12:30 pm at the Brennan Tree Farm; 7773 Fancy Tract Rd; Ellicottville, NY. Free and open to the public.

Ellicottville, New York (August 19, 2019) - The Allegheny Foothills Chapter of the NY Forest Owners Association and Cornell Cooperative Extension of Cattaraugus County invite you to join them to learn about managing your woods in the wake of the Emerald Ash Borer. Hosts Dick Brennan and family will have their consulting forester, Eric Stawitzky on hand to explain the steps taken to salvage valuable Ash timber while improving the woods for the future. Cornell Cooperative Extension foresters Peter Smallidge and Brett Chedzoy will also be there to share related tips for managing invasive forest plants and establishing new trees following the harvest or loss of mature ones. There is much to see and learn from in the company of fellow woodland owners. The walk will take place rain or shine with up to one mile of walking in forest conditions, so please dress for the weather. To help accurately plan for complimentary light refreshments, reservations are requested by Thursday, September 19th by calling Tamara Bacho at Cornell Cooperative Extension of Cattaraugus County at 716-699-2377 X 100 or tsb48@cornell.edu. For more information on the Woods Walk, please contact Dick Brennan at: 716-699-4125.
 
Detailed travel instructions:  From the Village of Ellicottville go east on NY 242 for approximately 6 miles, then turn left (north) onto Fancy Tract Rd. and immediately go over a RR crossing – Caution this is an active line – proceed ½ mile on Fancy Tract Rd. and the property will be on the West (left) side. The house has a row of mature white pines on each side. Parking is available on a log landing and along the road.

This informational program is being supported by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Cattaraugus County, and “Farmland for a New Generation New York – in partnership with American Farmland Trust, and supported by the State of New York.” For more information, visit Farmland for a New Generation New York at www.NYFarmlandFinder.org.


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Wednesday, May 29, 2019

2019 Cattaraugus County Envirothon



Cattaraugus-Little Valley Central School’s Team #1 took first place in the 2019 Cattaraugus County Envirothon, held on May 1st at Allegany State Park.  Led by advisor Mr. Tony Schabloski, the team will now advance to represent Cattaraugus County at the 2019 New York State Envirothon at Hobart & William Smith Colleges in Geneva on May 22nd and 23rd.  Randolph Central School’s Team #1 placed 2nd, and Franklinville’s Team #1 placed 3rd in this year’s event.  

In all, 9 teams representing 6 schools participated in this year’s program. Other participating schools included Allegany-Limestone, Ellicottville, and Hinsdale.  In all, over 45 high school students competed in the program.  The Envirothon has been held in Cattaraugus County since 1992.

The Envirothon is the largest conservation education program in North America, and begins at the local level with several schools from each county competing to advance to a statewide and ultimately a continent-wide event.  The Cattaraugus County Envirothon is organized by the Cattaraugus County Soil & Water Conservation District. 

The Envirothon is an outdoor, hands-on event that emphasizes teamwork, with each participating school sending up to two five-member teams of high school students.  The teams compete to test their knowledge of various natural resource related topics, including wildlife, forestry, soils, aquatics, and a current issue topic, which for 2019 was “Agriculture & the Environment:  Knowledge & Technology to Feed the World".  The teams work together to complete exams at five different stations that address these subjects.  They may be required to identify various species of trees, wildlife, and fish that are available on display and answer specific questions about habitat and other environmental issues related to the species.  They may also identify aquatic insects or use a soil survey report to evaluate the soils on a given site.  An oral presentation on the Current Issues topic is rated as part of the score at the Current Issues station.  Scores for the five exams are totaled, and the team with the highest cumulative score wins the competition.

The Cattaraugus County Soil and Water Conservation District pulls together over 25 volunteers, including representatives from various agencies, organizations, and companies who pitch in to help carry out the event.  Some of these include USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and US Forest Service; NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation; Allegany State Park; Cornell Cooperative Extension; Cattaraugus County Dept. of Economic Development, Planning, & Tourism; Trout Unlimited; etc.  Several individual volunteers also assisted with the program as well.

Funding for the event is provided entirely from contributions received from many local businesses and organizations.  Gernatt Asphalt and New Enterprise Stone & Lime Co. were primary sponsors of the program in 2019.  These contributions are used for providing prizes, T-shirts, reference materials, and refreshments for the participants, as well as reserving the site and sending the winning team to the state competition.  Tree seedlings left over from the Conservation District’s spring sale were also given to the participating schools.

Brian Davis, Conservation District Field Manager and Envirothon Coordinator states that, “2019 was another great year for the Cattaraugus County Envirothon!  The students worked hard together as teams and competitive scores reflected their efforts.  The dedication, hard work, and support of our committee, our sponsors, and our schools all make the program a tremendous success each and every year.”